May 17, 2017 btsclou3

Poor Circulation or Oedema Sufferers — Get Inclined To Sleep 

No doubt about it: there’s nothing swell about poor circulation or oedema. After all, who wants the ice-cold sensation in your feet and hands that often rides accompanies these conditions? Then there is the unsightly swelling as a result of fluid build-up, which is also known as peripheral oedema.  

You can find yourself saddled with these complaints through a variety of causes, like:  

  • Lengthy sedentary periods 
  • Poor diet 
  • Excess weight or obesity. 

 Whatever the cause of poor circulation or swelling, the results are highly detrimental to your health and your sleep quality. 

Poor circulation typically gets progressively worse. Ultimately you will wind up with symptoms and pain as a result of poor circulation when you are engaged in low levels of activity or even when you are completely at rest. Associated pain and discomfort from the swelling and circulatory bottlenecks are often worse at night with no let-up. Despite your best efforts to alleviate the circulatory pain, you will likely find that there is little or no relief to be found. 

This sounds like a prognosis of doom and gloom for poor circulation sufferers, but it’s time to take a new slant on the matter. The fact is, you can improve circulation and offset the swelling, pain and fluid retention – all while you sleep. Elevated sleeping can help correct fluid accumulation and stimulate circulation. 

Elevating your feet above your heart level while you sleep will go a long way towards alleviating swelling of your legs. Raising your legs will help facilitate blood flow and gravity will chip in to reduce swelling and kick-start circulation. 

You can even get some great elevated sleeping innovations these days with inbuilt heat and vibration capabilities. So you can soothe those pesky circulatory aches and pains while enjoying a much more restful night’s sleep. 

 

References 

UAB Health System: Is Poor Circulation Giving You a Case of Cold Feet? 

Harvard University Family Health Guide: Leg Cramps 

 

 

 

 

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